The Next Generation
The Newsletter of Community-Centered Education
(The on-line version includes only a sampling of the hard-copy version)
Summer 1997


 
 

hat does it mean to be a Montanan? This question underlies much of the work of the Heritage Project. Obviously, such a question doesn't have the sort of objectively true answer that is pursued by scientists. But there are other sorts of truths that grow out of what we desire and what we will-- truths that we make with our lives. In old England, young couples at marriage ceremonies publicly pledged their "troth" to one another-- their lives and their plighted beings-- and if they kept their promises to each other and to their community, their lives made truth of their pledges. . .   MORE. . .




otivating students has always been the most important challenge educators face. It's easy to motivate someone to do something he already has some inclination toward, but learn the mechanics of writing? Where's the divine spark that ignites that fire? It's frustrating. Introduce something important, subject/verb agreement for example, and the only question you get is, "Why do I have to know this?"    MORE. . .


he ethics of photographing people: Two definitions of the word "ethics" are "the rules or standards governing the conduct of the members of a profession," and "the moral quality of a course of action." Both definitions are useful when thinking about photographing people. As heritage reporters, some of you will be taking photographs of people. . . MORE. . .


hematic approach to historical fiction: Many stories of the American West involve a willingness to take risks to achieve reward. This theme is also central to the coming-of-age story, which is developmentally relevant for adolescents who are grappling with identity as they question who they are, where they fit in, and what paths are available. . .
 MORE. . .



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he Montana Heritage Project is a collaborative educational initiative between the American Folklife Center at the Library of Congress, the Montana Historical Society, the Office of Public Instruction, the Montana Arts Council, and the Montana Committee for the Humanities. It has involved citizens and teachers from Bigfork, Broadus, Chester, Corvallis, Fort Benton, Libby, Pryor, Red Lodge, Roundup, St. Ignatius, Simms, and Townsend. The Project is sponsored by the Liz Claiborne and Art Ortenberg Foundation. For further information, contact Project Director Michael Umphrey or Project Manager Katherine Mitchell at P.O. Box 672; St. Ignatius, MT 59865 (406) 745-2600, email umphrey@edheritage.org

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