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The Montana Heritage Project Site History


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Tuesday, January 11, 2005

Drilling through Time
  A History of the Montana Heritage Project in 

Roundup

Classes that participated

Local Legacies
Quilting III and Quilting IV
Research Writing
English I
English III

Teachers who participated

Mr. Tom Thackeray
Mr. Dale Alger
Mrs. Sherry Pertile
Mr. Tim Schaff

Students who participated

Student Research 9th Grade Montana Heritage Project--Thackeray

1. Lindsey Appell

2. Abby Newell

3. Tessa Mosdal

4. Erika Sibley

5. Shannon Sallee

6. Haley Williams

7. Nicole Gustin

8. Danielle Miller

9. Lacee Moore

10. Traci Harper

11. Jessica Anderson

12. Dusti Kowalski

13. Sebastian Schickle

14. Justin Dotson

Research Writing

1. Stephanie Shipp

2. Jennifer Charlton

Local Legacies

Jessie Crane
Stephanie Shipp
Dan Newell
Travis Bourne
Ben Watkins
Jake Shanks
Jennifer Charlton
Jason Smith

English III (38 students):
The bulk of these students work will be completed this spring.

English III, Period 1
Amber Blodgett,
Dane Christensen,
Danielle Fife,
Melissa Green,
Sarah Ingalls,
Jyll Lemmon,
Sam Merfeld,
Shaina Pauley,
Jenna Rodeghiero,
Rachel Satterfield,
Carol Stahl,
Lance Vescovi

English III, Period 5
James Crane,
Thomas Downey,
Seth Eslinger,
Sara Goffena,
Matt Hiermeier,
Scott Kingham,
Patrick Krebs,
April Madison,
Julie Maurer,
Steven Moore,
Victor Pekah,
Rebekah Roth,
Andy Shepard,
Stephanie Shipp,
Patrick Turley,
Shawna Waller,
Shayna Waller

English III, Period 7

Nick Carlson,
Fehrenbach, Amanda
Sarah Feiock,
Kemper, Jennell
Billy Miller,
Omicioli, Jennifer
Sterling Rech,
Fawna Riesinger,
CJ Rogers,
Darren Rook,
Loni Sallee,
Dustin Schultz,
Megan Stockert

Total Number of Students Involved: 

61

Community Members and Teachers who participated

Tim Schaff--English III, Local Legacies (Team Leader)
Tom Thackeray, English I, Research Writing
Dale Alger--Librarian
Sherry Pertile--Family and Consumer Sciences

John Pfister--County Agent

Gifts of Scholarhip Created

Student Research 9th Grade Montana Heritage Project--Thackeray

1. Lindsey Appell—Grandparent article; interview with Concetta Picchioni

2. Abby Newell—Grandparent article; interview with Opal Sabin

3. Tessa Mosdal—Grandparent article; interview with Lawrence Sealey

4. Erika Sibley—Grandparent interview; interview with Mary Brower

5. Shannon Sallee—Grandparent interview; interview with Opal Sabin

6. Haley Williams—Grandparent interview; interview with Concetta Picchioni

7. Nicole Gustin—Grandparent interview; interview with George Recyzk

8. Danielle Miller—Grandparent interview; interview with George Recyzk

9. Lacee Moore—Grandparent interview; interview with Hazel Moore

10. Traci Harper—Grandparent interview; interview with Hazel Moore

11. Jessica Anderson—Grandparent interview; interview other grandmother

12. Dusti Kowalski—Grandparent interview; interview Great-Grandmother

13. Sebastian Schickle—Grandparent interview; 1960s expedition

14. Justin Dotson—Grandparent interview; WWII expedition

Research Writing

1. Stephanie Shipp—Central School

2. Jennifer Charlton—Veteran’s Administration

Local Legacies

1.  Jessie Crane and Stephanie Shipp--Walt Pfister Interview and transcript.  Jessie Crane--The True Cost of War
Jesse Crane—Honor Lap Quilt for Walt Pfister

2.  Dan Newell and Travis Bourne--Dave Hagstrom Interview and transcript

3.  Ben Watkins and Jake Shanks—Tom Hueser Interview and transcript

4.  Jake Shanks—The Creation of Musselshell County, Tom Huesar Interview and Transcript, Leonard Wall Interview (Recorder failed to work to be reinterviewed).

5.  Jennifer Charlton—Memory Lap Quilt Oil History, Leonard Wall Interview.  Research Writing Paper (See above).

6.  Ben Watkins, Daniel Newell and Jason Smith—Archival Oil Field Pictures of Cat Creek discovery wells.

English III (38 students):
The bulk of these students work will be completed this spring.

Thus far English III students interviewed parents or grandparents after training by Dottie Susag.  Tapes were not required.
Representative work from this assignment:
Sterling Rech--"Even the Greatest Fall”

A Narrative History of the 2005 Project

Ask: Questions posed by Students

Questions used for the project this year included the following:

1. Why did you and your families choose to move to this area?
2. What was it like to grow up in a time of economic stress like the depression?
3. What is the same now as it was then?
4. What is different now?
5. What was Roundup like when the mines were operating?
6. What was the valley like before Dead Man’s Basin was completed?
7. What things are better now?
8. What things about life in the valley are worse now?
9. What things were better then?
10. What things were worse?
11. How did the development of the oil industry affect the local economy?
12. How did the workers change or add to the social fabric of the community?
13.  What interesting characters (people) did you meet in the course of your work?  Could you tell us some stories about them?

1. Could you state your name for the record?
2. Where and when were you born?
3. What were your parents’ names?
4. What did you do before entering the service?
5. Where were you living?
6. Before we start the interview about your service, do you have any pictures that you would like to show us from your service or after?
7. Did you enlist or were you drafted?
8. Can you tell us why you joined?
9. In which branch of the service did you serve? What rank did your attain?
10. For WWII veterans:  Where were you when Pearl Harbor was attacked?
11. What thoughts and feelings did your parents have when you entered the service?
12. Where did you go for basic training?
13. To what unit were you assigned??
14. Could you tell us about your commanders/officers?  What were they like?  What generals did you serve under
15. What duty did you have during the war?  Could you describe a typical day or more than one if your duties and training changed as the war progressed?
16. What was the morale like in your unit?
17. Could you describe the food in the military?
18. Did you have any contact with the local population while you were deployed?  Could you describe them?
19. Did you see any combat?  What was that like?  Could you describe some specific days or battles for us?
20. Did you witness any acts of heroism that you would like to describe for us?
21. Did you know any conscientious objectors?  If so, how did you feel about them and their positions?
22. How did you feel about the president at the time (FDR, WWII; Truman, Eisenhower, Korea; JFK, LBJ and Nixon Vietnam).
23. Did you correspond with the people at home?  Have you kept any correspondence?
24. What did you like least about your time in the service?  What did you like most?
25. Did you have any siblings who were serving at the same time as you?
26. What did your family members who were at home do while you were serving?  How did the war change their lives?  What did they think about the war?
27. When were you discharged?  What happened during the last days of your service?
28. What was your homecoming like?  What did you notice most? Who did you see?  Where was the first place you went when you arrived back in the USA? Home?
29. Do you keep in contact with any of the people that you served with?  Have you gone to reunions of your unit?  What are these reunions like?
30. Did you bring any souvenirs home?  How did you get them?  Have you kept them?  May we see them?
31. What advice would you give your grandchildren or anyone who is joining the service today?
Post War:

1. What did you do for a living after the war?
2. Did your wartime service contribute to your career after the war?
3. Are you a member of any veteran’s or other organizations related to your service? Why?
4. Is there anything else that you’d like to talk about or ask us? 

Listen: Researching the Historical/Literary Record

Literature Review:

The first major literature review that the Local Legacies students participated involved preparation for the Veteran’s Project.  Student read James Bradley’s Flags of Our Fathers.

Students have approximately 50 articles detailing the early excitement surrounding the oil boom of the 1920’s and the second boom of the 1940’s in preparation for interviewing oil field workers.  They also read the 1953 series from the Montana Magazine of Western History, “Second Boom,” which detailed the statewide developement of the oil industry as well as numerous production and geological reports from 1926-1981 of Montana.  At this point, students need exposure a geologist to grasp the full meaning of some of the reports.

While Legacies students have been working the past two quarters they also selections “Montana,High Wide and Handsome” by Howard.  This work is done to prepare students for interviewing and other research projects.  The Roundup Heritage Project believes that students must understand that nothing in history happened in isolation and that current events are still heavily influenced by past events.  We also believe that knowledgeable students are much more adept at recognizing important information when they hear it in an interview or read it in the process of research.

Students will complete the reading of this book this spring.

Juniors in English III have read Emerson’s “Self-Reliance” as their first taste of primary documents, and will continue into shorter documents, diaries and letters, from the 1910’s homestead era of our local area prior to researching Musselshell County history. 

Explore: Contributing to Local Knowledge

New knowledge which will be shared with the community include all the essays and transcripts, but more importantly the self-awareness surrounding economic development and personal development has become readily apparent in many of the students.

Below is a list of products:

Student Research 9th Grade Montana Heritage Project--Thackeray

1. Lindsey Appell—Grandparent article; interview with Concetta Picchioni

2. Abby Newell—Grandparent article; interview with Opal Sabin

3. Tessa Mosdal—Grandparent article; interview with Lawrence Sealey

4. Erika Sibley—Grandparent interview; interview with Mary Brower

5. Shannon Sallee—Grandparent interview; interview with Opal Sabin

6. Haley Williams—Grandparent interview; interview with Concetta Picchioni

7. Nicole Gustin—Grandparent interview; interview with George Recyzk

8. Danielle Miller—Grandparent interview; interview with George Recyzk

9. Lacee Moore—Grandparent interview; interview with Hazel Moore

10. Traci Harper—Grandparent interview; interview with Hazel Moore

11. Jessica Anderson—Grandparent interview; interview other grandmother

12. Dusti Kowalski—Grandparent interview; interview Great-Grandmother

13. Sebastian Schickle—Grandparent interview; 1960s expedition

14. Justin Dotson—Grandparent interview; WWII expedition

Research Writing

1. Stephanie Shipp—Central School

2. Jennifer Charlton—Veteran’s Administration

Local Legacies

1.  Jessie Crane and Stephanie Shipp--Walt Pfister Interview and transcript.  Jessie Crane--The True Cost of War
Jesse Crane—Honor Lap Quilt for Walt Pfister

2.  Dan Newell and Travis Bourne--Dave Hagstrom Interview and transcript

3.  Ben Watkins and Jake Shanks—Tom Hueser Interview and transcript

4.  Jake Shanks—The Creation of Musselshell County, Tom Huesar Interview and Transcript, Leonard Wall Interview (Recorder failed to work to be reinterviewed).

5.  Jennifer Charlton—Memory Lap Quilt Oil History, Leonard Wall Interview.  Research Writing Paper (See above).

6.  Ben Watkins, Daniel Newell and Jason Smith—Archival Oil Field Pictures of Cat Creek discovery wells.

English III (38 students):
The bulk of these students work will be completed this spring.

Thus far English III students interviewed parents or grandparents after training by Dottie Susag.  Tapes were not required.
Representative work from this assignment:
Sterling Rech--"Even the Greatest Fall”

Spring Interviews English III. (Writing project was short reflection paper on differences between life of students and elder).

Sarah Ingalls:  Interview and log with Vi Hill (good one)

Jyll Lemmon, Dane Christensen, and Melissa Green: Interview and log with Jesse Zeier.

Carol Stahl, Shaina Pauley, Amber Blodgett: Interview and log with

Lance Vescovi and Jenna Rodeghiero: Interview and log Fayer Turley

Scott Kingham, James Crane and Matt Heiermeier: Interview and log with Darrel Brewer

April Madison, Fawna Reisinger and Rachel Satterfield: Interview and log with Mr. Morlan (not particulary good interview)

Julie Maurer, Sara Goffena, and Patrick Krebs: Interview and log with Concetta Picchioni

Victor Pekah, Seth Esslinger: Interview and log with Shorty Roberts (short, subject uncooperative)

Amanda Fehrenbach, Shawn Waller and Shayna Waller, Becca Roth: Interview and log with Buck Roth

Sarah Feiock, Dani Fife: Interview and tape log with Agnes Hagstrom

Kemper, Jennell, Loni Sallee: Interview and tape log with Lillian Overend

Billy Miller, Omicioli, Jennifer, Patrick Turley and Nick Carlson,:  Interview and tapelog with Francis Turley

Sterling Rech, Darren Rook: Interview and tapelog with Jon Funk

CJ Rogers, Steven Moore: Interview and tape log with **** Amsbaugh (no release) assignment invalid

Dustin Schultz, Thomas Downey: Interview and tape log with Jim Downey (Interview only 6 minutes long, subject uncooperative)

Megan Stockert : Tribute DVD to deceased grandfather, Martin Stockert (6 minute long)

Reflect: Student Reflection Activities

Student participated in a variety of personal interviews, essay writing, journalistic style writing and reading as reflected in the products produced, transcripts created, and the gifts of scholarship documented in this report.

Teach: Students as Teachers

Student Research 9th Grade Montana Heritage Project--Thackeray

1. Lindsey Appell—Grandparent article; interview with Concetta Picchioni

2. Abby Newell—Grandparent article; interview with Opal Sabin

3. Tessa Mosdal—Grandparent article; interview with Lawrence Sealey

4. Erika Sibley—Grandparent interview; interview with Mary Brower

5. Shannon Sallee—Grandparent interview; interview with Opal Sabin

6. Haley Williams—Grandparent interview; interview with Concetta Picchioni

7. Nicole Gustin—Grandparent interview; interview with George Recyzk

8. Danielle Miller—Grandparent interview; interview with George Recyzk

9. Lacee Moore—Grandparent interview; interview with Hazel Moore

10. Traci Harper—Grandparent interview; interview with Hazel Moore

11. Jessica Anderson—Grandparent interview; interview other grandmother

12. Dusti Kowalski—Grandparent interview; interview Great-Grandmother

13. Sebastian Schickle—Grandparent interview; 1960s expedition

14. Justin Dotson—Grandparent interview; WWII expedition

Research Writing

1. Stephanie Shipp—Central School

2. Jennifer Charlton—Veteran’s Administration

Local Legacies

1.  Jessie Crane and Stephanie Shipp--Walt Pfister Interview and transcript.  Jessie Crane--The True Cost of War
Jesse Crane—Honor Lap Quilt for Walt Pfister

2.  Dan Newell and Travis Bourne--Dave Hagstrom Interview and transcript

3.  Ben Watkins and Jake Shanks—Tom Hueser Interview and transcript

4.  Jake Shanks—The Creation of Musselshell County, Tom Huesar Interview and Transcript, Leonard Wall Interview (Recorder failed to work to be reinterviewed).

5.  Jennifer Charlton—Memory Lap Quilt Oil History, Leonard Wall Interview.  Research Writing Paper (See above).

6.  Ben Watkins, Daniel Newell and Jason Smith—Archival Oil Field Pictures of Cat Creek discovery wells.

English III (38 students):
The bulk of these students work will be completed this spring.

Thus far English III students interviewed parents or grandparents after training by Dottie Susag.  Tapes were not required.
Representative work from this assignment:
Sterling Rech--"Even the Greatest Fall”

Personal Reflections

The personal view of the staff or the Roundup Heritage Project has evolved over the past year.  We have come to believe that while Heritage Education is invaluable to students and community it is also a deeply personal process. This aspect drives some students to excel while others pull back from the process because it is too personal or because they lack the interest or connection to family and community.

We believe that community or place driven education is the proper way to extend education beyond the traditional industrial model of education, and that the Montana Heritage Project will provide a model that Montana educators as well as educators at the national level will choose to emulate.

Our personal goals were met for the most part.  Mr. Thackeray’s freshman classes proved to have gained the most from the project.  The writing of his students was inspirational.

Mr. Schaff’s decision to explore the oil industry proved to be much more daunting and ephermal than planned, so that part of the project fell short of its expected objectives.  The Veteran’s Project once again proved to be the most popular and meaningful to the older students in Local Legacies.

Students Jesse Crane, Stephanie Shipp, Jake Shanks and Jennifer Charlton provided their own drive and inspiration in a number of unusual areas.  Stephanie’s work in her efforts to get Central School on the National Historic Register has been inspiring.  Jessie’s attachement and commitment to WW II veteran Walt Pfister continues to move us.  Jake’s sheer joy in discovery of all aspects of the project continues to amaze us.  Students like these make the project worthwhile.  If we could somehow figure out how we were able to get through to these students, perhaps we could move education to where it should be and laws such as No Child Left Behind would cease to be a necessity. 

Posted by on 01/11 at 03:38 PM

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